FAQs


Tips for resolving possible browser cache problems or forcing the browser to load a fresh copy of web site pages.

Most browsers, computer operating systems, and internet hardware (routers, etc.) employ some type of caching to reduce the amount of time needed to resolve the actual address of a web site. When a site moves to a new server or is assigned a new IP address, you may experience problems accessing the site from your computer, even though the site is actively working and available. This is usually caused by caching, where your computer or browser uses old information to try to reach the site, but it needs to update that information to find the site properly. Here are some tips for forcing your browser and computer to use current information instead of its obsolete cache data when trying to reach the site:

The easiest way to force most browsers, particularly Internet Explorer and Firefox, to retrieve a fresh copy of the page directly from the server is to press CTRL+F5 while viewing the page. In most cases, this will force the browser to update its cache with the most recent version of the page.

Here are some additional tips for clearing the various temporary caches so your browser will go to the proper address for the site:

• The easiest way to force most browsers, particularly Internet Explorer, Firefox, and Chrome to retrieve a fresh copy of the page directly from the server is to press CTRL+F5 while viewing the page. In most cases, this will force the browser to update its cache with the most recent version of the page.

• To clear/reset your cache in Internet Explorer, click the Tools menu and select Internet Options from the menu, then click the Delete Files button in the Internet Options window that appears (this page may vary in different versions of IE). This option may be found on the General tab under the Browsing History section. For Firefox, use the Clear Private Data menu option to remove temporary cache files. In Chrome, select Settings from the "Wrench" icon menu, then select Under the Hood, then click Clear Browsing Data.

• Check your settings for reloading of pages in Internet Explorer. Click the Tools menu and select Internet Options from the menu, then click the Settings button (In Version 7, this is on the General tab under the Browsing History section), then select the option to check for newer versions of pages on "every visit to the page".

• Clear your local Windows DNS cache which is responsible for resolving the location of your site. Bring up a command window by clicking Start, then Run, then enter "CMD" and press enter. In the command window that opens, enter the following command: IPCONFIG /FLUSHDNS {press enter}

• Rebooting your computer after completing these steps may also help resolve the issue by helping to clear any additional caching being done by the operating system or other internet applications running on your computer.

• If you are using a router, it may have its own internal cache. If possible, reboot the router to see if it will resolve the issue.

The following Microsoft Knowledgebase article has more information about clearing the cache in Internet Explorer:
http://www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/ie6/using/howto/customizing/clearcache.mspx#EWE